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2-year-old boy released from hospital goes home for first time ever



An Omaha family is bringing home their baby for the first time ever. It might not sound like a news story at first, but it will be the first time Marquinn “Q” Buckley II has ever left the hospital in his two years of life.Q was born prematurely at 27 weeks. He weighed just 13.8 ounces at birth. His lungs hadn’t fully developed. As a result, the boy spend the entirety of his life in hospitals using a ventilator to breathe. Tuesday, his parents got the chance to bring their little boy home from Madonna Rehabilitation’s Omaha campus. “From the womb, he wasn’t supposed to make it,”said Marquinn’s mom, Ta’Riance Harris.His mom said she and her son may not have survived without the right care.“We had a team of doctors,” said Harris. “We probably had like six doctors who were all working together to make sure he came out, and make sure he stayed and make sure he survived.”Doctors worked tirelessly to keep Q well, without bouts of coughing, but nothing was working.“It really does become problematic when you’re used to seeing results with things and you start hitting a wall,” said pediatric pulmonologist Dr. Gordon Still.“It takes a while to recover from things, so any bump in the road is going to take him a lot longer than any other child to recover from,” said pediatrict hospitalist Dr. Sheilah Snyder.After a leap of faith, his doctors found the right medications and therapy. They gave his mom and dad the green light to take him home.“From him coughing all the time, non-stop to him barely coughing now, that’s greatness to us,” said Marquinn Buckley.It has been a rough road for Q’s parents, carving time out every day to visit their son in the hospital.“Coming here then going home and getting ready for the next day, I felt like that was harder than just being able to come home and being with your child,”said Buckley.Now, with his parents, respite care and a tracheostomy and ventilator, the three can start a new chapter together.“I think what shocks everybody most is how much complications and stuff that he had going wrong with him, he was still a happy baby,” said Buckley. “He was still energetic.”“I mean, we’ve been moving along but it feels like now we can do things as a family,” said Harris.

An Omaha family is bringing home their baby for the first time ever.

It might not sound like a news story at first, but it will be the first time Marquinn “Q” Buckley II has ever left the hospital in his two years of life.

Q was born prematurely at 27 weeks. He weighed just 13.8 ounces at birth. His lungs hadn’t fully developed. As a result, the boy spend the entirety of his life in hospitals using a ventilator to breathe.

Tuesday, his parents got the chance to bring their little boy home from Madonna Rehabilitation’s Omaha campus.

“From the womb, he wasn’t supposed to make it,”said Marquinn’s mom, Ta’Riance Harris.

His mom said she and her son may not have survived without the right care.

“We had a team of doctors,” said Harris. “We probably had like six doctors who were all working together to make sure he came out, and make sure he stayed and make sure he survived.”

Doctors worked tirelessly to keep Q well, without bouts of coughing, but nothing was working.

“It really does become problematic when you’re used to seeing results with things and you start hitting a wall,” said pediatric pulmonologist Dr. Gordon Still.

“It takes a while to recover from things, so any bump in the road is going to take him a lot longer than any other child to recover from,” said pediatrict hospitalist Dr. Sheilah Snyder.

After a leap of faith, his doctors found the right medications and therapy. They gave his mom and dad the green light to take him home.

“From him coughing all the time, non-stop to him barely coughing now, that’s greatness to us,” said Marquinn Buckley.

It has been a rough road for Q’s parents, carving time out every day to visit their son in the hospital.

“Coming here then going home and getting ready for the next day, I felt like that was harder than just being able to come home and being with your child,”said Buckley.

Now, with his parents, respite care and a tracheostomy and ventilator, the three can start a new chapter together.

“I think what shocks everybody most is how much complications and stuff that he had going wrong with him, he was still a happy baby,” said Buckley. “He was still energetic.”

“I mean, we’ve been moving along but it feels like now we can do things as a family,” said Harris.

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