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Protestors gather to stop execution of Bigler Stouffer



Protestors gathered outside the Oklahoma Governor’s Mansion to stop the execution of death row inmate Bigler Stouffer. In 1985, Stouffer was convicted of killing a Putnam City teacher Linda Reaves and seriously injuring her boyfriend. He is set to be executed Thursday morning.The protestors who gathered on Wednesday night were against all executions, opposed to the state being able to kill people. They suggest there is too much doubt in this specific case.”The DNA testing proves that he had no blood on him and if you shoot somebody, putting the gun touching her head, you would have been covered in brains and blood,” said Abraham Bonowitz of Death Penalty Action.Another member of Death Penalty Action had another reason.”It doesn’t matter if you get killed in Ohio, Oklahoma, or Texas, it’s wrong. It’s wrong for anybody to have the authority to take another man’s life, that’s why we call one man a killer. How can you not call another man the killer?” said Charles Keith.Both reasons were why a few dozen people gathered outside and across the street from the Governor’s Mansion.Last month, the state’s Pardon and Parole Board recommended clemency for Stouffer because of doubt in the drugs being used. However, this had nothing to do with Stouffer’s conviction.The clemency recommendation was denied by Gov. Kevin Stitt last week.”Life without parole, that’s a harsh punishment but it’s a lot better than death, there’s so many alternatives and I don’t think they’re looking at that,” Keith said.Unless a last-second appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court is successful, Stouffer will be put to death Thursday morning at 10 a.m. in McAlester.

Protestors gathered outside the Oklahoma Governor’s Mansion to stop the execution of death row inmate Bigler Stouffer.

In 1985, Stouffer was convicted of killing a Putnam City teacher Linda Reaves and seriously injuring her boyfriend. He is set to be executed Thursday morning.

The protestors who gathered on Wednesday night were against all executions, opposed to the state being able to kill people. They suggest there is too much doubt in this specific case.

“The DNA testing proves that he had no blood on him and if you shoot somebody, putting the gun touching her head, you would have been covered in brains and blood,” said Abraham Bonowitz of Death Penalty Action.

Another member of Death Penalty Action had another reason.

“It doesn’t matter if you get killed in Ohio, Oklahoma, or Texas, it’s wrong. It’s wrong for anybody to have the authority to take another man’s life, that’s why we call one man a killer. How can you not call another man the killer?” said Charles Keith.

Both reasons were why a few dozen people gathered outside and across the street from the Governor’s Mansion.

Last month, the state’s Pardon and Parole Board recommended clemency for Stouffer because of doubt in the drugs being used. However, this had nothing to do with Stouffer’s conviction.

The clemency recommendation was denied by Gov. Kevin Stitt last week.

“Life without parole, that’s a harsh punishment but it’s a lot better than death, there’s so many alternatives and I don’t think they’re looking at that,” Keith said.

Unless a last-second appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court is successful, Stouffer will be put to death Thursday morning at 10 a.m. in McAlester.

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